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Eat this, not that: 4 Healthy Ways to Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth

Eat this, not that: 4 Healthy Ways to Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth



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1. Eat whole fruit, not fruity candy. Whole fruits can contain quite a bit of sugar, but have no fear, those sugars are all-natural. So instead of reaching for a bag of Skittles or chowing down on some Laffy Taffy, satisfy your sweet tooth by reaching for some fruit. Some fruits on the sweeter side are cherries, strawberries, apples, pears, bananas, and mango.

Photo by lardonmyfrench

2. Eat dark chocolate, not chocolate cake. Do you really want cake? Or are you just looking for that rich, chocolately taste? Curb your cake cravings with dark chocolate. Dark chocolate with at least a 60% cacao content is healthy and full of fiber and antioxidants. If this bittersweet treat is a tad too bitter for you, dip some strawberries or banana slices in melted dark chocolate.

Photo by geishabot

3. Have a Greek yogurt smoothie or parfait, not ice cream or a milkshake. It isn’t easy resisting a creamy scoop of ice cream or refreshing milkshake after dinner, but beware of the amount of saturated fat in ice cream. Why not have a Greek yogurt smoothie or parfait instead? Greek yogurt is just has creamy and satisfying but also much healthier and higher in protein than ice cream. Simply blend some frozen or fresh fruit with Greek yogurt to make a simple smoothie, or try one of these four delectable ideas.

photo by Jill Pyle

4. Eat homemade granola, not sugary cereals or granola. Store-bought cereals and granola contain too much sugar to be healthy for your waistline. I’ll admit that I love the crunchiness and sweet taste of cereal and granola, and homemade granola can be made to be just as delicious without as much sugar. In a bowl, mix rolled oats, nuts and seeds, unsweetened dried fruit, coconut oil, vanilla extract, and raw honey. Spread a thin layer of the mixture in a baking pan and bake at 300 degrees Fahrenheit for about 15 minutes or until it is lightly toasted. Raw honey and vanilla extract will sweeten the granola without the processed, unnatural sugars in store-bought cereals and granola.

The post Eat this, not that: 4 Healthy Ways to Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth originally appeared on Spoon University. Please visit Spoon University to see more posts like this one.


4 Reasons Why You Should Eat These Small Sustainable Fish

Small fish like anchovies and sardines are sustainable, healthy, tasty, and last forever in the pantry.

Small fish have long been dismissed as good only for bait. They&aposve also had to face down an unappealing reputation, as that oily, pungent, overly salty stuff inside a can. Yet the tide has been rising in favor of small bait for many years now, and for multiple, excellent reasons.

The first is sustainability. Since they&aposre pretty low on the food chain, finger-sized fish require little in the way of resources. And since they&aposve (yet) to be overfished like popular catches such as tuna and salmon, they&aposre still readily available in the wild sidestepping farming practices that contribute to pollution, exhaust valuable resources, and often run havoc with the ecosystem. And they&aposre not all dependent on the same optimal ocean temperatures — some teensy fish flourish in warm weather, and others in cold — meaning small species don&apost experience population fluctuations all at once.

The second upside of diminutive fish is health benefits. That assertive oiliness that was once considered a detriment? Consumers are realizing that it translates to an abundance of nutrients — in fact, anchovies and sardines are as rich in omega-3s as it gets. And that&aposs not all. Their teeny-weeny bodies are pretty much powerhouses of vitamins, minerals, proteins and amino acids, while the tender, edible bones are an excellent source of calcium.

The third (and most recent) advantage credited to small bait, are the very tins that people once turned their noses up at. Now that everyone is hoarding cans, they can appreciate the value of preserved protein. And whether contained in oil or water, little fish don&apost sacrifice any of their nutritional content by being packaged.

And of course, the fourth score for small fish is that they&aposre absolutely delicious! Enjoyed straight up, or prepared in a variety of ways, they deliver full-throttled flavor in a tiny package.

So read on for our showcase of the most available and versatile miniature fish, along with recipes and ideas on what to do with them.


4 Reasons Why You Should Eat These Small Sustainable Fish

Small fish like anchovies and sardines are sustainable, healthy, tasty, and last forever in the pantry.

Small fish have long been dismissed as good only for bait. They&aposve also had to face down an unappealing reputation, as that oily, pungent, overly salty stuff inside a can. Yet the tide has been rising in favor of small bait for many years now, and for multiple, excellent reasons.

The first is sustainability. Since they&aposre pretty low on the food chain, finger-sized fish require little in the way of resources. And since they&aposve (yet) to be overfished like popular catches such as tuna and salmon, they&aposre still readily available in the wild sidestepping farming practices that contribute to pollution, exhaust valuable resources, and often run havoc with the ecosystem. And they&aposre not all dependent on the same optimal ocean temperatures — some teensy fish flourish in warm weather, and others in cold — meaning small species don&apost experience population fluctuations all at once.

The second upside of diminutive fish is health benefits. That assertive oiliness that was once considered a detriment? Consumers are realizing that it translates to an abundance of nutrients — in fact, anchovies and sardines are as rich in omega-3s as it gets. And that&aposs not all. Their teeny-weeny bodies are pretty much powerhouses of vitamins, minerals, proteins and amino acids, while the tender, edible bones are an excellent source of calcium.

The third (and most recent) advantage credited to small bait, are the very tins that people once turned their noses up at. Now that everyone is hoarding cans, they can appreciate the value of preserved protein. And whether contained in oil or water, little fish don&apost sacrifice any of their nutritional content by being packaged.

And of course, the fourth score for small fish is that they&aposre absolutely delicious! Enjoyed straight up, or prepared in a variety of ways, they deliver full-throttled flavor in a tiny package.

So read on for our showcase of the most available and versatile miniature fish, along with recipes and ideas on what to do with them.


4 Reasons Why You Should Eat These Small Sustainable Fish

Small fish like anchovies and sardines are sustainable, healthy, tasty, and last forever in the pantry.

Small fish have long been dismissed as good only for bait. They&aposve also had to face down an unappealing reputation, as that oily, pungent, overly salty stuff inside a can. Yet the tide has been rising in favor of small bait for many years now, and for multiple, excellent reasons.

The first is sustainability. Since they&aposre pretty low on the food chain, finger-sized fish require little in the way of resources. And since they&aposve (yet) to be overfished like popular catches such as tuna and salmon, they&aposre still readily available in the wild sidestepping farming practices that contribute to pollution, exhaust valuable resources, and often run havoc with the ecosystem. And they&aposre not all dependent on the same optimal ocean temperatures — some teensy fish flourish in warm weather, and others in cold — meaning small species don&apost experience population fluctuations all at once.

The second upside of diminutive fish is health benefits. That assertive oiliness that was once considered a detriment? Consumers are realizing that it translates to an abundance of nutrients — in fact, anchovies and sardines are as rich in omega-3s as it gets. And that&aposs not all. Their teeny-weeny bodies are pretty much powerhouses of vitamins, minerals, proteins and amino acids, while the tender, edible bones are an excellent source of calcium.

The third (and most recent) advantage credited to small bait, are the very tins that people once turned their noses up at. Now that everyone is hoarding cans, they can appreciate the value of preserved protein. And whether contained in oil or water, little fish don&apost sacrifice any of their nutritional content by being packaged.

And of course, the fourth score for small fish is that they&aposre absolutely delicious! Enjoyed straight up, or prepared in a variety of ways, they deliver full-throttled flavor in a tiny package.

So read on for our showcase of the most available and versatile miniature fish, along with recipes and ideas on what to do with them.


4 Reasons Why You Should Eat These Small Sustainable Fish

Small fish like anchovies and sardines are sustainable, healthy, tasty, and last forever in the pantry.

Small fish have long been dismissed as good only for bait. They&aposve also had to face down an unappealing reputation, as that oily, pungent, overly salty stuff inside a can. Yet the tide has been rising in favor of small bait for many years now, and for multiple, excellent reasons.

The first is sustainability. Since they&aposre pretty low on the food chain, finger-sized fish require little in the way of resources. And since they&aposve (yet) to be overfished like popular catches such as tuna and salmon, they&aposre still readily available in the wild sidestepping farming practices that contribute to pollution, exhaust valuable resources, and often run havoc with the ecosystem. And they&aposre not all dependent on the same optimal ocean temperatures — some teensy fish flourish in warm weather, and others in cold — meaning small species don&apost experience population fluctuations all at once.

The second upside of diminutive fish is health benefits. That assertive oiliness that was once considered a detriment? Consumers are realizing that it translates to an abundance of nutrients — in fact, anchovies and sardines are as rich in omega-3s as it gets. And that&aposs not all. Their teeny-weeny bodies are pretty much powerhouses of vitamins, minerals, proteins and amino acids, while the tender, edible bones are an excellent source of calcium.

The third (and most recent) advantage credited to small bait, are the very tins that people once turned their noses up at. Now that everyone is hoarding cans, they can appreciate the value of preserved protein. And whether contained in oil or water, little fish don&apost sacrifice any of their nutritional content by being packaged.

And of course, the fourth score for small fish is that they&aposre absolutely delicious! Enjoyed straight up, or prepared in a variety of ways, they deliver full-throttled flavor in a tiny package.

So read on for our showcase of the most available and versatile miniature fish, along with recipes and ideas on what to do with them.


4 Reasons Why You Should Eat These Small Sustainable Fish

Small fish like anchovies and sardines are sustainable, healthy, tasty, and last forever in the pantry.

Small fish have long been dismissed as good only for bait. They&aposve also had to face down an unappealing reputation, as that oily, pungent, overly salty stuff inside a can. Yet the tide has been rising in favor of small bait for many years now, and for multiple, excellent reasons.

The first is sustainability. Since they&aposre pretty low on the food chain, finger-sized fish require little in the way of resources. And since they&aposve (yet) to be overfished like popular catches such as tuna and salmon, they&aposre still readily available in the wild sidestepping farming practices that contribute to pollution, exhaust valuable resources, and often run havoc with the ecosystem. And they&aposre not all dependent on the same optimal ocean temperatures — some teensy fish flourish in warm weather, and others in cold — meaning small species don&apost experience population fluctuations all at once.

The second upside of diminutive fish is health benefits. That assertive oiliness that was once considered a detriment? Consumers are realizing that it translates to an abundance of nutrients — in fact, anchovies and sardines are as rich in omega-3s as it gets. And that&aposs not all. Their teeny-weeny bodies are pretty much powerhouses of vitamins, minerals, proteins and amino acids, while the tender, edible bones are an excellent source of calcium.

The third (and most recent) advantage credited to small bait, are the very tins that people once turned their noses up at. Now that everyone is hoarding cans, they can appreciate the value of preserved protein. And whether contained in oil or water, little fish don&apost sacrifice any of their nutritional content by being packaged.

And of course, the fourth score for small fish is that they&aposre absolutely delicious! Enjoyed straight up, or prepared in a variety of ways, they deliver full-throttled flavor in a tiny package.

So read on for our showcase of the most available and versatile miniature fish, along with recipes and ideas on what to do with them.


4 Reasons Why You Should Eat These Small Sustainable Fish

Small fish like anchovies and sardines are sustainable, healthy, tasty, and last forever in the pantry.

Small fish have long been dismissed as good only for bait. They&aposve also had to face down an unappealing reputation, as that oily, pungent, overly salty stuff inside a can. Yet the tide has been rising in favor of small bait for many years now, and for multiple, excellent reasons.

The first is sustainability. Since they&aposre pretty low on the food chain, finger-sized fish require little in the way of resources. And since they&aposve (yet) to be overfished like popular catches such as tuna and salmon, they&aposre still readily available in the wild sidestepping farming practices that contribute to pollution, exhaust valuable resources, and often run havoc with the ecosystem. And they&aposre not all dependent on the same optimal ocean temperatures — some teensy fish flourish in warm weather, and others in cold — meaning small species don&apost experience population fluctuations all at once.

The second upside of diminutive fish is health benefits. That assertive oiliness that was once considered a detriment? Consumers are realizing that it translates to an abundance of nutrients — in fact, anchovies and sardines are as rich in omega-3s as it gets. And that&aposs not all. Their teeny-weeny bodies are pretty much powerhouses of vitamins, minerals, proteins and amino acids, while the tender, edible bones are an excellent source of calcium.

The third (and most recent) advantage credited to small bait, are the very tins that people once turned their noses up at. Now that everyone is hoarding cans, they can appreciate the value of preserved protein. And whether contained in oil or water, little fish don&apost sacrifice any of their nutritional content by being packaged.

And of course, the fourth score for small fish is that they&aposre absolutely delicious! Enjoyed straight up, or prepared in a variety of ways, they deliver full-throttled flavor in a tiny package.

So read on for our showcase of the most available and versatile miniature fish, along with recipes and ideas on what to do with them.


4 Reasons Why You Should Eat These Small Sustainable Fish

Small fish like anchovies and sardines are sustainable, healthy, tasty, and last forever in the pantry.

Small fish have long been dismissed as good only for bait. They&aposve also had to face down an unappealing reputation, as that oily, pungent, overly salty stuff inside a can. Yet the tide has been rising in favor of small bait for many years now, and for multiple, excellent reasons.

The first is sustainability. Since they&aposre pretty low on the food chain, finger-sized fish require little in the way of resources. And since they&aposve (yet) to be overfished like popular catches such as tuna and salmon, they&aposre still readily available in the wild sidestepping farming practices that contribute to pollution, exhaust valuable resources, and often run havoc with the ecosystem. And they&aposre not all dependent on the same optimal ocean temperatures — some teensy fish flourish in warm weather, and others in cold — meaning small species don&apost experience population fluctuations all at once.

The second upside of diminutive fish is health benefits. That assertive oiliness that was once considered a detriment? Consumers are realizing that it translates to an abundance of nutrients — in fact, anchovies and sardines are as rich in omega-3s as it gets. And that&aposs not all. Their teeny-weeny bodies are pretty much powerhouses of vitamins, minerals, proteins and amino acids, while the tender, edible bones are an excellent source of calcium.

The third (and most recent) advantage credited to small bait, are the very tins that people once turned their noses up at. Now that everyone is hoarding cans, they can appreciate the value of preserved protein. And whether contained in oil or water, little fish don&apost sacrifice any of their nutritional content by being packaged.

And of course, the fourth score for small fish is that they&aposre absolutely delicious! Enjoyed straight up, or prepared in a variety of ways, they deliver full-throttled flavor in a tiny package.

So read on for our showcase of the most available and versatile miniature fish, along with recipes and ideas on what to do with them.


4 Reasons Why You Should Eat These Small Sustainable Fish

Small fish like anchovies and sardines are sustainable, healthy, tasty, and last forever in the pantry.

Small fish have long been dismissed as good only for bait. They&aposve also had to face down an unappealing reputation, as that oily, pungent, overly salty stuff inside a can. Yet the tide has been rising in favor of small bait for many years now, and for multiple, excellent reasons.

The first is sustainability. Since they&aposre pretty low on the food chain, finger-sized fish require little in the way of resources. And since they&aposve (yet) to be overfished like popular catches such as tuna and salmon, they&aposre still readily available in the wild sidestepping farming practices that contribute to pollution, exhaust valuable resources, and often run havoc with the ecosystem. And they&aposre not all dependent on the same optimal ocean temperatures — some teensy fish flourish in warm weather, and others in cold — meaning small species don&apost experience population fluctuations all at once.

The second upside of diminutive fish is health benefits. That assertive oiliness that was once considered a detriment? Consumers are realizing that it translates to an abundance of nutrients — in fact, anchovies and sardines are as rich in omega-3s as it gets. And that&aposs not all. Their teeny-weeny bodies are pretty much powerhouses of vitamins, minerals, proteins and amino acids, while the tender, edible bones are an excellent source of calcium.

The third (and most recent) advantage credited to small bait, are the very tins that people once turned their noses up at. Now that everyone is hoarding cans, they can appreciate the value of preserved protein. And whether contained in oil or water, little fish don&apost sacrifice any of their nutritional content by being packaged.

And of course, the fourth score for small fish is that they&aposre absolutely delicious! Enjoyed straight up, or prepared in a variety of ways, they deliver full-throttled flavor in a tiny package.

So read on for our showcase of the most available and versatile miniature fish, along with recipes and ideas on what to do with them.


4 Reasons Why You Should Eat These Small Sustainable Fish

Small fish like anchovies and sardines are sustainable, healthy, tasty, and last forever in the pantry.

Small fish have long been dismissed as good only for bait. They&aposve also had to face down an unappealing reputation, as that oily, pungent, overly salty stuff inside a can. Yet the tide has been rising in favor of small bait for many years now, and for multiple, excellent reasons.

The first is sustainability. Since they&aposre pretty low on the food chain, finger-sized fish require little in the way of resources. And since they&aposve (yet) to be overfished like popular catches such as tuna and salmon, they&aposre still readily available in the wild sidestepping farming practices that contribute to pollution, exhaust valuable resources, and often run havoc with the ecosystem. And they&aposre not all dependent on the same optimal ocean temperatures — some teensy fish flourish in warm weather, and others in cold — meaning small species don&apost experience population fluctuations all at once.

The second upside of diminutive fish is health benefits. That assertive oiliness that was once considered a detriment? Consumers are realizing that it translates to an abundance of nutrients — in fact, anchovies and sardines are as rich in omega-3s as it gets. And that&aposs not all. Their teeny-weeny bodies are pretty much powerhouses of vitamins, minerals, proteins and amino acids, while the tender, edible bones are an excellent source of calcium.

The third (and most recent) advantage credited to small bait, are the very tins that people once turned their noses up at. Now that everyone is hoarding cans, they can appreciate the value of preserved protein. And whether contained in oil or water, little fish don&apost sacrifice any of their nutritional content by being packaged.

And of course, the fourth score for small fish is that they&aposre absolutely delicious! Enjoyed straight up, or prepared in a variety of ways, they deliver full-throttled flavor in a tiny package.

So read on for our showcase of the most available and versatile miniature fish, along with recipes and ideas on what to do with them.


4 Reasons Why You Should Eat These Small Sustainable Fish

Small fish like anchovies and sardines are sustainable, healthy, tasty, and last forever in the pantry.

Small fish have long been dismissed as good only for bait. They&aposve also had to face down an unappealing reputation, as that oily, pungent, overly salty stuff inside a can. Yet the tide has been rising in favor of small bait for many years now, and for multiple, excellent reasons.

The first is sustainability. Since they&aposre pretty low on the food chain, finger-sized fish require little in the way of resources. And since they&aposve (yet) to be overfished like popular catches such as tuna and salmon, they&aposre still readily available in the wild sidestepping farming practices that contribute to pollution, exhaust valuable resources, and often run havoc with the ecosystem. And they&aposre not all dependent on the same optimal ocean temperatures — some teensy fish flourish in warm weather, and others in cold — meaning small species don&apost experience population fluctuations all at once.

The second upside of diminutive fish is health benefits. That assertive oiliness that was once considered a detriment? Consumers are realizing that it translates to an abundance of nutrients — in fact, anchovies and sardines are as rich in omega-3s as it gets. And that&aposs not all. Their teeny-weeny bodies are pretty much powerhouses of vitamins, minerals, proteins and amino acids, while the tender, edible bones are an excellent source of calcium.

The third (and most recent) advantage credited to small bait, are the very tins that people once turned their noses up at. Now that everyone is hoarding cans, they can appreciate the value of preserved protein. And whether contained in oil or water, little fish don&apost sacrifice any of their nutritional content by being packaged.

And of course, the fourth score for small fish is that they&aposre absolutely delicious! Enjoyed straight up, or prepared in a variety of ways, they deliver full-throttled flavor in a tiny package.

So read on for our showcase of the most available and versatile miniature fish, along with recipes and ideas on what to do with them.